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Dingle Peninsula

The Blasket Islands

The Blasket Islands is a small archipelago of 6 main islands plus many tiny smaller islands lying about 5km off the Dingle peninsula. 

View Islands

These islands are Ireland’s, and Europe’s, most westerly point. The islands are no longer inhabited, having been abandoned in 1953 when years of hardship and emigration meant the aging remaining islanders could no longer manage the difficult task of rowing their traditional canoes (naomhoga) to the mainland. While no people currently live on the islands, various wildlife certainly does.

An Blascaod Mór
Inis na Bró
Inis Mhic Uibhleáin 
An Tiaracht 
Inis Tuaisceart
Beiginis
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Island – 01

An Blascaod Mór

The village is at the eastern end of the island. You can wander among the ruined cottages and consider how despite the remote hardships the villagers endured they still managed to contribute so much to the Irish cultural heritage. The first written works to be published from the oral Irish culture came from these people, most notably the Irish storyteller Peig Sayers (remembered with mixed emotions by many Irish school children who had to study her works!). Below the village lies An Trá Bhán (the white strand). Take a ferry from Dunquin Harbour. The crossing takes about 20 minutes (weather permitting). The Great Blasket Island, the largest of the six Blasket Islands, sits as the westernmost group in Ireland and continental Europe, 2km from the mainland at Dunmore Head. Extending 6km to the southwest, its landscape features cliffs, beaches, and hills, with An Cró Mór rising to 292 meters. Formerly home to a Gaelic-speaking community until their evacuation in 1953, it now symbolizes Ireland’s literary and natural heritage, attracting visitors with its history and scenery, leaving a lasting cultural legacy. 

Island – 02

Inis na Bró

The village is at the eastern end of the island. You can wander among the ruined cottages and consider how despite the remote hardships the villagers endured they still managed to contribute so much to the Irish cultural heritage. The first written works to be published from the oral Irish culture came from these people, most notably the Irish storyteller Peig Sayers (remembered with mixed emotions by many Irish school children who had to study her works!). Below the village lies An Trá Bhán (the white strand). Take a ferry from Dunquin Harbour. The crossing takes about 20 minutes (weather permitting). The Great Blasket Island, the largest of the six Blasket Islands, sits as the westernmost group in Ireland and continental Europe, 2km from the mainland at Dunmore Head. Extending 6km to the southwest, its landscape features cliffs, beaches, and hills, with An Cró Mór rising to 292 meters. Formerly home to a Gaelic-speaking community until their evacuation in 1953, it now symbolizes Ireland’s literary and natural heritage, attracting visitors with its history and scenery, leaving a lasting cultural legacy. 

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Island – 03

Inis Mhic Uibhleáin 

Mac Uibhleáin’s Island, situated off the coast of the picturesque Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland, is a rugged and enigmatic gem of the region. Accessible only by boat, this uninhabited island is steeped in history and folklore, boasting ancient ruins and breathtaking landscapes. Its remote location adds to its allure, attracting adventurers, historians, and nature enthusiasts seeking to explore its hidden treasures. From its towering cliffs to its secluded beaches, Mac Uibhleáin’s Island offers visitors a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in Ireland’s rich cultural heritage and natural beauty, while uncovering the secrets of this mysterious island that has captured the imagination of generations.

Island – 04

An Tiaracht

Westerly Island, nestled off the western coast of the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland, is a tranquil haven of rugged beauty and natural wonders. Accessible only by boat, this secluded island offers visitors a peaceful retreat from the hustle and bustle of modern life. Tearaght (or Tiaracht) boasts Europe’s steepest funicular track. It’s lighthouse, dating from 1870, is the most westerly lighthouse in Ireland. The island has a Puffin colony that served as a source of food and feathers for the Islanders’ bedding. With its pristine beaches, towering cliffs, and panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean, Westerly Island beckons adventurers and nature lovers alike to explore its unspoiled landscapes and discover the rich biodiversity that thrives in its remote surroundings. Whether you’re seeking solitude, adventure, or simply a chance to reconnect with nature, Westerly Island promises an unforgettable experience filled with tranquility and awe-inspiring beauty.

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Island – 05

Inis Tuaisceart

Inis Tuaisceart (Inishtooskert) is often referred to as “the Sleeping Giant” due to the shape of it’s silhouette. The island has the ruins of an oratory known as Brendan’s Oratory. North Island, situated off the coast of the picturesque Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland, is a hidden gem waiting to be discovered. With its rugged cliffs, pristine beaches, and stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean, North Island offers visitors a chance to immerse themselves in the natural beauty of Ireland’s west coast. Accessible only by boat, this secluded island provides a peaceful retreat for those seeking solitude and adventure alike. Whether you’re exploring its rocky shores, observing its diverse wildlife, or simply enjoying the serenity of its surroundings, North Island invites you to experience the raw beauty and untamed wilderness of Ireland’s coastline.

Island – 06

Beiginis 

This island was traditionally used by the islander to fatten cattle. There are the remains of a herdsman’s shelter. One can only imagine the challenges of such a role with only beauty and solitude for comfort. The Little Island, nestled off the coast of the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland, is a charming retreat offering tranquility and natural beauty. With its rugged coastline, secluded coves, and breathtaking vistas of the Atlantic Ocean, this small but enchanting island provides a serene escape from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. Accessible only by boat, The Little Island invites visitors to explore its winding trails, discover its hidden beaches, and immerse themselves in the peaceful ambiance of Ireland’s coastal wilderness. Whether you’re seeking solitude, adventure, or simply a moment of quiet contemplation, The Little Island promises an unforgettable experience amidst the untouched splendor of nature.

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